Scout Report – Myles Garrett

  • Position: 4-3 Defensive End
  • Previous Team: Texas A&M Aggies (College)
  • Status: Draft Prospect

Age: 21, Height: 6’5, Weight: 270 lbs, Experience: 3 years (College)

garrett
Few can deny how much of a physical specimen Myles Garrett (15) truly is
  • Average opposing offense rank: 62.5
  • Average opposing pass offense rank: 68.3
  • Average opposing rush offense rank: 56.9
  • Scouted block shed record: 26-41-38, 18 Double Teams, 11 No Contests
    • 2 games scouted
    • Week 7 v. Alabama, Week 10 v. Ole Miss

stats

Strengths:

  • Excellent initial burst off the snap. Swiftness is an excellent asset Garrett Possesses
  • Good instincts against the run game. Was able to know when the runner would bounce to the outside, and give good chase right behind.
  • Good vision for finding the ball carrier. Rarely fell for deception plays, and if he did, would not be fooled for long. Runners and QBs have a small window of opportunity on Play Action or trick plays.
  • Exceptional Strength. Can be seen bullrushing any and all would-be blockers, for the most part forcing them to give up footing if not the block entirely.
  • Agility and swift feet allow for him to on occasion get around a lineman before they can even set their feet. Causing him to be a potential playmaker on any given play if focus is not 100%.
  • Superb power rusher. Playstyle wise, favors power moves to finesse (more likely to try and go through a blocker than around)
pros
The SEC has trained Garrett to be a hound against the rush

Weaknesses:

  • Major lack in stamina. Can be out of play for some key drives, or would see a drastic drop in performance in the middle of drives.
  • Unhealthy habit of taking plays off. It can be frustrating at times to watch as he will do well for a streak of plays, then appear to not even try for a good number before trying again.
  • Too one-dimensional. Prefers, and for the most part, will only really use the bullrush to get past blockers. while keeping track of his moveset, I recorded his moves for 67 plays (28 for Bama, 39 for Ole Miss), and discovered he attempted a bull rush 49 times, meaning he attempts to overpower 73% of the time. He only attempted a proper rip technique 4 times, and a spin twice.
  • Subpar pursuer. If the play is too far gone by his standards, he doesn’t try. Against Alabama, that did cause a play where the runner ran to the right sideline, only to reverse and run toward the left instead. Garrett was caught off guard and missed the tackle while Bama gained a good chunk of yardage.
  • Horrible against double teams, best to stay on the outside
  • Not a very good tackler, has had tackles broken or missed a number of times.
  • Gets stood up by blockers fairly easily. A number of his losses came from the blocker breaking his momentum just be getting him up.
  • Bad Coverage skills, does not try too much. Either does not care for zone coverage when called to do it, or does not have good vision on keeping track of the RBs from being free in his domain.
  • Could be classified as a “World Traveler” since he has such a hard time staying home on outside runs. Reverses have killed him and his team on numerous occasions.
cons
Garrett, in all his physical traits, still is weak on the basics of tackling

Overall:

I’ll be honest, I do not see #1 draft pick when I watch Garrett. Outside of his physical capabilities and stature, there is little to say he is a complete beast and a surefire #1 overall draft pick. Don’t get me wrong, the guy can be a monster at times; An absolute disruptive force from the outside, but I am not a fan of a player who does not have longevity on the drive. Against Ole Miss alone, I recorded ten instances where he was subbed out, one of which was in the Redzone. This is the most of any player I have scouted to date, and while I have only looked at 5 players total (4 incoming rookies, 1 free agent), none have been subbed out as much as Garrett. The big reason why I have second doubts about this guy comes in the week 7 match up against Alabama. The team itself was not why I chose to watch that game, it was for the Bama Left Tackle Cam Robinson, another draft prospect and NFL ranked 4th best lineman in the incoming draft. It was a big match between the #1 guy versus the 4th best Lineman. What I saw was an absolute shutdown. He was only double teamed 5 times that day (he was double teamed 13 times against Ole Miss), Robinson didn’t need help because Garrett was not a threat. This is not to say Garrett is a complete bust, in fact much of his weaknesses come from the position and scheme he played in. being a 4-3 DE meant Garrett was always lined up on the outside of the LT, and was more likely to be responsible for different assignments than a 3-4 DE. This was indeed the case, as Garrett was not just in charge of rushing the pocket, but also containment, zone coverage on the flat, and even QB spy ironically. Garrett’s assignments were numerous which showcased how versatile he can be; however, also spotlighted weaknesses otherwise not seen had he just been a pure rusher. Getting away from the negativity, Garrett is indeed a physical specimen, almost akin to a Greek God, and can play like one. His playstyle is physical and in your face, and his burst off the snap is terrifying. No matter the play he always finds a way to creep into the pocket. Also, playing in the SEC gives him one major advantage: He is deadly against the run as the SEC is a run heavy conference in college ball. Going into his rookie year, Garrett’s biggest asset comes from his size and strength. Give him enough time and he can be a destroyer of O’s on the inside or the out. His greatest liability is his stamina. Being an All Pro means one must be capable of playing as the anchor of the defense, and anchors are useless on the sidelines. I am not in the popular opinion, and it is all but guaranteed Garrett will go first overall, but even if he doesn’t, Garrett is a top 5 pick hands down, and look for his number when the season starts, he just might be blowing up your Quarterback.

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